Wednesday, November 14, 2012

Open Letter Update - AND EXCITING NEWS!

Super exciting news! My counter protest story has been cross-posted at Flyover Feminism, a website for "feminists/womanists/activists outside major media centers" whose "voices are frequently left out of the national dialogue."

I had a bunch of technical issues submitting, so it made my day yesterday to find out they loved it and were posting it. Probably even made my week. Definitely helped push me over the edge to get this next bit of news out despite midterms, labs and lack of sleep.

Anyways, even if you don't want to read my post again, please check them out - there are some truly fantastic stories.

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So, into the meat of things:

You may remember this letter that I posted mid-October about a sexist critical thinking test that I wrote in school.

You may not. It's been an embarrassingly long time since then. I could say I was giving it needed space, but really that's only the tip of the iceberg. I was also trying to keep up with the insanity that is engineering, talking myself in and out of asking the boy I liked out, and, since the start of November, trying not to fall behind too badly for NaNoWriMo.

And... I was doubting myself. Worrying over the consequences, over being thought silly and overemotional.

But I wasn't going to let it sit forever. The letter still rings true to me, and so I'm sending it in to my prof. I don't know what kind of response I'll get. I'm scared. But I'm doing it anyways.

I want to thank everyone who encouraged me to send the letter in, who commented on the post with their thoughts, or who spread the word. I want you to know how much it meant to me to know I could be taken seriously.

Taking the advice I received into consideration, I edited the letter slightly, aiming for a more professional but no less passionate tone. I left the emotion in, but steered it away from 'angry student/teenager' territory and pulled the snark.

See, my goal is to get them to stop using the test, and I don't think raging about inequality and sexism is the best way to achieve that goal in this context. I know I don't have to be nice to be heard, but in this "professional" context I think it's important to match my tone to the situation.

To that end, I'm also including the letter as an attachment to an email that will be entirely professional and uber-respectful. I want the email to convince the prof to read the letter and take it seriously. I want him to understand that while the letter isn't written to him, that doesn't absolve him of a duty to act.

By the time you read this, the email will be sent. No turning back. And sure, I'm not really risking anything... but it doesn't feel like a trivial step that I'm taking.

So thanks for being here with me. Thanks for supporting me. I'll keep you in the loop.

~ Morgan